Program Areas

The Uganda Wildlife Society (UWS) is a membership, non governmental organization on a mission to promote the conservation of wildlife and environment in Uganda.

Programme Areas

In an effort to fulfill our mission and objectives, UWS engages the following four programme areas:-

Environment policy research and advocacy

Policy research equips the Society with the capacity to develop learned positions that will positively impact natural resource policy and legislation in Uganda and is, therefore, the precursor to its advocacy, education and awareness activities. The Society has a national focus within a regional perspective and works in partnership with local communities, government, and international, regional, private agencies and academic institutions in its environmental research, advocacy and awareness efforts.

Policy research at the Society is aimed at contributing to the improvement of environmental governance by ensuring that government, public and private institutions remain accountable to the public for environmental conservation and providing alternative sources of information to influence policy reform processes.

Conservation education and awareness

The Society employs a range of advocacy, education and awareness tools as it targets its members, key decision-makers, environmental policymaking processes and the general public. These tools include research reports, policy briefs, and policy dialogues, public debates, engaging Members of Parliament in various fora, media campaigns, an environmental hotline, and petitions. As a result, the Society, working in partnership with others, has been able to encourage institutional reforms and impact a number of natural resource policies and legislation in Uganda. The Society also conducts monthly debates at the National museum on environment and conservation issues.

Wildlife, Forest and Wetland Conservation

Wildlife populations in protected areas continue to recover following instability in Uganda in the 1970s and 1980s. However, with human population growth exceeding 3% annually, Uganda has one of the fastest population growth rates in the world. This has increased pressures on Uganda’s wildlife and its habitat inside and outside protected areas. Between 1990 and 2005, Uganda lost 26.3 percent of its remaining forest cover, and deforestation continues today at a rate of 2.2 percent per year, mostly due to subsistence farming, cutting for fuelwood, and colonization by the burgeoning population. On the other hand, wetlands, which cover a total of 13% of Uganda’s land area, face similar challenges which among others include drainage of Wetland, introduction of new crops like rice, pollution, over-harvesting, reclamation for industrial developments, human settlements in swampy areas. The Society, through its advocacy and education and awareness activities carries out publicity about wetland ecosystems especially Ramsar sites.

Community conservation projects

The Society develops, implements and supports field-based conservation projects. These projects are aimed at involving local communities in the management and conservation of vital ecosystems. These projects are also geared towards improving the community livelihoods through non-consumptive use of natural resources, particularly via eco-tourism. The Ziika Forest Management Project and Nyundo Community Project are two such projects being carried out by the Society

Program AreasThe Uganda Wildlife Society (UWS) is a membership, non governmental organization on a mission to promote the conservation of wildlife and environment in Uganda.Programme AreasIn an effort to fulfill our mission and objectives, UWS engages the following four programme areas:-Environment policy research and advocacyPolicy research equips the Society with the capacity to develop learned positions that will positively impact natural resource policy and legislation in Uganda and is, therefore, the precursor to its advocacy, education and awareness activities. The Society has a national focus within a regional perspective and works in partnership with local communities, government, and international, regional, private agencies and academic institutions in its environmental research, advocacy and awareness efforts. Policy research at the Society is aimed at contributing to the improvement of environmental governance by ensuring that government, public and private institutions remain accountable to the public for environmental conservation and providing alternative sources of information to influence policy reform processes.Conservation education and awarenessThe Society employs a range of advocacy, education and awareness tools as it targets its members, key decision-makers, environmental policymaking processes and the general public. These tools include research reports, policy briefs, and policy dialogues, public debates, engaging Members of Parliament in various fora, media campaigns, an environmental hotline, and petitions. As a result, the Society, working in partnership with others, has been able to encourage institutional reforms and impact a number of natural resource policies and legislation in Uganda. The Society also conducts monthly debates at the National museum on environment and conservation issues.Wildlife, Forest and Wetland ConservationWildlife populations in protected areas continue to recover following instability in Uganda in the 1970s and 1980s. However, with human population growth exceeding 3% annually, Uganda has one of the fastest population growth rates in the world. This has increased pressures on Uganda’s wildlife and its habitat inside and outside protected areas. Between 1990 and 2005, Uganda lost 26.3 percent of its remaining forest cover, and deforestation continues today at a rate of 2.2 percent per year, mostly due to subsistence farming, cutting for fuelwood, and colonization by the burgeoning population. On the other hand, wetlands, which cover a total of 13% of Uganda’s land area, face similar challenges which among others include drainage of Wetland, introduction of new crops like rice, pollution, over-harvesting, reclamation for industrial developments, human settlements in swampy areas. The Society, through its advocacy and education and awareness activities carries out publicity about wetland ecosystems especially Ramsar sites. Community conservation projectsThe Society develops, implements and supports field-based conservation projects. These projects are aimed at involving local communities in the management and conservation of vital ecosystems. These projects are also geared towards improving the community livelihoods through non-consumptive use of natural resources, particularly via eco-tourism. The Ziika Forest Management Project and Nyundo Community Project are two such projects being carried out by the Society